September 17, 1857 – great Russian scientist-pioneer, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, is born

Tsiolkovsky.jpg

His name was Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky. He was born September 17, 1857 and died September 19, 1935, at age 78. He was an early pioneer in astronautics theory though he spent most of his life in a simple log cabin outside of Moscow. Though he was born even before the American Civil War he theorized about space travel and rocket propulsion. He is considered to the ‘father of spaceflight’. He also believed that the colonization of space would lead to the perfection of the human race.

During his life time he published over 500 works related to space travel including some science fiction novels. In a letter the year before his death (see below) he wrote, My works is the unassuming contribution to world science, but it’s the inherent part of humanity aspiration for the progress.

His theories included rocket boosters, multistage rockets and space stations. There is a crater on the Moon named after the Russian scientist called the Tsiolkovsky Crater.

Quotes:

“The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever.”
Tsiolkovsky, cited in Wikipedia.

“Men are weak now, and yet they transform the Earth’s surface. In millions of years their might will increase to the extent that they will change the surface of the Earth, its oceans, the atmosphere and themselves. They will control the climate and the solar system just as they control the Earth. They will travel beyond the limits of our planetary system; they will reach other Suns and use their fresh energy instead of the energy of their dying luminary.”
Tsiolkovsky, cited in Wikipedia.

Hand-written notes and drawing from Russian scientist Tsiolkovsky
Hand-written note by Tsiolkovsky related to space travel.
Image credit: eBay auction item

Letter reads:

Dear Alexander Romanovich!
I am very grateful to you for the parcel and the letter, in which I found the true understanding of the problems. My works is the unassuming contribution to world science, but it’s the inherent part of humanity aspiration for the progress.
With respect,
K.Tsiolkovsky [signed]
Kaluga, May 7th, 1934.

Image credit: eBay auction item

Recommended Links:

  • RussianSpaceWeb site

Recommended Reading:

Advertisements

~ by tellinghistory on September 17, 2007.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: